Blog     Photos   

Wildlife Photography – Glacier National Park New Wildlife Photography and Viewing Policy is Unrealistic

Most people enjoy wildlife photography. In fact, the chance to see and maybe photograph wildlife is among the top reasons people go to Glacier National Park. Are you aware that there are new viewing rules in place than may surprise you? Today, wildlife viewing and wildlife photography may be a bit more challenging based on the stringency of the new rules.  The new Glacier National Park Wildlife Viewing Policy states,

To protect wildlife the following activities are prohibited” 1) Willfully approaching, remaining, viewing, or engaging in any activity within 100 yards of bears, or wolves, or within 25 yards of any other wildlife including nesting birds; or within any distance that disturbs, displaces, or otherwise interferes with the free unimpeded movement of wildlife, or creates or contributes to a potentially hazardous condition or situation.” (italics added).

two mountain goats, billy on cliff (Tony Bynum/tonybynum.com)

Although I was standing next to one of the most used trails in Glacier National Park (the Hidden Lake Trail) a shot such as the one of these two mountain goats in glacier national park, could be considered in violation of the current wildlife viewing policy. As a side note, there were about 15 other people on the this section of the trail, some going some coming, and some, like me, snapping a few photos for the scrapbook. This trail gets 1000′s of visitor every day and it would not be possible to avoid close encounters with wild goats on this trail. The new regulation would mean that if wildlife were present, no one could stop to enjoy the setting and take in the views. So what is this policy meant to accomplish? Wildlife Photography by Tony Bynum

How close to wildlife should wildlife photographers and tourists be is a subject of ongoing debate and controversy among regulators, the public, and even some wildlife photographers. Depending on who you ask, opinions differ about proper wildlife viewing policies. I’m not suggesting we all should become Steve Irwin’s but if we now no longer can “remain, view, or engage in any activity within 25 yards of any wildlife” and give up our own viewing space, at any cost, we may be creating additional problems. I am saying we should all use some common sense, but the rule, as written is un obtainable assuming people will remain part of the Glacier National Park fabric. The National Park Service, Glacier National Park appears to believe the observer/visitor should always leave wildlife alone, and ignore and retreat when they are too close. In other words, you might say, “view briefly from a distance, but don’t stay long.” In fact, you might say, “don’t stay at all.

The New Wildlife Viewing Policy  Glacier National Park’s most current policy is, “25 yards from any other wildlife, including nesting birds,” and “100 yards from bears or wolves.” And you must  not, “interfere with the free unimpeded movement” (GNP “Final Compendium 2013″ section 1.5, iii, h). After a little more research online, I found this diagram on the Glacier National Park website. It describes 100 feet from mammals like sheep, moose, and elk, but the “Compendium” says only 25 yards. By the way, most of the wildlife photographs on the Glacier National Park website are not consistent with it’s own wildlife viewing policy.

distance from wildlife that is considered safe by the National Park Service.

distance from wildlife that is considered safe by the National Park Service.

Personally, I can live with this but the truth is, some animals become very habituated and exceedingly aggressive when this policy is employed. Let me explain based on years of observing and photographing wildlife across North America. The National Park Service, Glacier National Park has updated it’s rules for how close you can be to wildlife in Glacier National Park. Here’s the new policy found in the, “2013 Final Compendium” section 1.5, 111,:

specific language from the Glacier National Park "compendium"

specific language from the Glacier National Park “compendium”

So, given the realities of actively recreating in Glacier National Park – on or off trail, on or off pavement, one could wholly comply with this rule? It is verging on absurd and a challenge in the very least.

When Animals are in Charge.  In some national parks (Rocky Mountain, Olympic, Yellowstone and others), wildlife like elk, deer, bears, and even birds and buffalo are so habituated they can actually become dangerous to spectators or observers, because they have zero fear of humans, in fact, they know they’re, “in charge.” Essentially some wildlife have completely lost their fear of humans and have become more aggressive because they have learned that their aggression will actually cause humans to unnecessarily retreat. This power gives them the “upper hand.” Contrast that with the national forest, or areas where the 25 yard rule is not active. I’d challenge anyone to get within 25 yards of wildlife (with the exception of some campgrounds where you can find wildlife that are routinely fed). . . In areas where you CAN get as close as you want, you seldom see them up close. Why is this?

Mostly, I think it’s due to hunting pressure. That said, if wildlife know that you will run away when they come toward you, they will learn to move faster and with more aggression toward humans – this is opposite to what you would expect. So, it’s my observation that in areas where wildlife are “protected” and people continuously retreat from wildlife, the wildlife become more aggressive and therefore more dangerous. Again, I think this is because there is no consequences to the animal for getting too close to humans — they know they are dominant. In some cases, elk become so aggressive that they charge people and even vehicles, and “attack,” when not provoked.

I’m not suggesting you approach potentially dangerous wild animals like a grizzly bear, but when we run from wildlife, naturally they learn that they are in charge. When people don’t move or they put some pressure on wildlife they gain respect and are far less likely to approach people. Some argue that close is as close as the species will allow without causing harm. In places like Glacier National Park wildlife photography and viewing is sometimes like shooting fish in a barrel. There are times when if all you want is a photo of a sheep or a goat you might well find your subject cruising the parking lot on Logan Pass.

If we always follow the policy, what should we do when wildlife want to be in the parking lot? Do we have to leave? If you follow the rules, and you stay within 25 feet or approach any wildlife, you are violating the policy and by all accounts could be fined. Go to Logan Pass in the summer and you can see violations all day long . . . Seriously, keeping a safe distance from wildlife is always paramount. But creating rules that teach wildlife to become more “bold” or less afraid of people, might make them more dangerous, not less. It may also result in more dangerous animal human conflict as well. And why even write a policy that we all know will be constantly violated?

Animals that believe they are in charge usually are the one’s that get in the most trouble. By there being little or no consequence for aggressive behavior, wildlife become more and more aggressive because they have nothing to fear. In other words, if they learn that charging, or exhibiting aggressive behavior toward humans is acceptable, they will continue to be more and more aggressive. In some cases, wildlife need to know that humans are not subjects to mess with. Just a word of caution. I’m not suggesting we need to chase grizzly bears to make them respect humans. Grizzly bears, are by nature, more likely to stand their ground and fight or even attack if provoked by unwanted advances. By all means don’t approach grizzly bears. If you want to photograph grizzly bears do so at a distance and use long lenses.

For other species like elk, deer, bighorn sheep, mountain goats, and moose, they generally get as close to you as they are comfortable with little risk of harm to either of you. I have a comfort zone that I do not allow wildlife to enter. It’s different depending on the species. If wildlife get too close it makes for difficult photography too, so I think 25 yards, for most things is close enough. But I do not like to allow wildlife that may get to close either by accident or by design, push me around.  I do not retreat quickly because sometimes that tactic teaches them that they are dominant and therefore could increase the likelihood of animals taking chances that they would naturally not take. I don’t set out to get close. I do use common sense and give wildlife the distance and respect they deserve, but when I’m outside, in the mountains, I own my space and I decide what to do in it – each circumstance requires calumniated decision making.

At the end of the day, I would rather the wildlife in Glacier National Park not frequent parking lots and some popular nature trails, but as long as the policy is retreat and don’t stick around to view them, they will continue to put everyone in the strange position of violating the wildlife safety rules. Today is also not a time to discourage people from heading to Glacier National Park for some wildlife photography. Just take a look at the huge budget cuts Congress has sent the National Park Service, but that’s a story for another day. I believe if we all used a little more common sense things would be much better for everyone, including the animals.

A final thought.  Take a look at the Glacier National Park website and note how they use images of wildlife – how many of those images do you think were captured using it’s own Wildlife Viewing Policy?  Even this photograph of a black bear violates it own policy.

Here are a few helpful links.

Glacier National Park Wildlife Policy Press Release: http://www.nps.gov/glac/parknews/media13-44.htm

Glacier National Park Wildlife Safety:  http://www.nps.gov/glac/planyourvisit/wildlifesafety.htm

Glacier National Park Wildlife Compendium, section 1.5, iii, h http://www.nps.gov/glac/parkmgmt/upload/Compendium-FINAL-2013.pdf

For more information about the wildlife policy in Glacier National Park, contact Denise Germann at 406-888-5838.

Enjoy yourselves out there in Glacier National Park, but don’t stick around and watch the animals, just move along please . . .

Sincerely, Tony Bynum, Montana Photographer

19 Responses to “Wildlife Photography – Glacier National Park New Wildlife Photography and Viewing Policy is Unrealistic”

  1. Robert Hanson says:

    Tony,
    My concern is what they will change the policy to next. It seams to me that the more rules that they implement the more it changes everything.
    I hope they don’t feel the need to increase the distances.

  2. Robert Hanson says:

    Tony,
    My concern is what they will change the policy to next. It seams to me that the more rules that they implement the more it changes everything.
    I hope they don’t feel the need to increase the distances.

  3. Tony says:

    Robert, the distance is not really the issue, it’s the rule that you cant stay looking at an animal if the animal notices you. Again, try going to glacier and hiking around without violating this policy . . .

  4. Larry Stolte says:

    Tony, what does item #4 of the policy mean ????

  5. Larry Stolte says:

    Based on the new rules Glacier should be closing the Highline Trail and the Hidden Lake Overlook trail … it is impossible to comply. I will have a lot on Glacier’s management in the near future (FB and letter to the editor of the Daily Inter Lake.

  6. Tony says:

    Larry, number 4 is the “out” for biologist, researchers, seasonal’s in the line of “hazing” duty, contract employees in the line of duty that includes possibly or deliberately violating the policy . . . It’s in there for admin use.

    As to your point about highline and hidden lake trails, i agree with you. But don’t forget the parking lot but more importantly, the over look and wildlife viewing platform they built at Oberlin bend . . . That platform is in the heart of mountain goat summer rearing grounds . . . it is impossible to be on that boardwalk if there are goats in the area and not violate the policy.

  7. Tony says:

    Comments from an email I received:

    Not sure what to think about the new regulations, I’ve found it impossible to legislate common sense. Never worked before and I doubt it’ll work in the future. We were rather rudely informed of the 25 yard limit by a Park Ranger. Granted some of the “photographers” were much too close to the rams, the situation could have been resolved by simply asking everyone to back away. Hell, the only reason I was close was to try and eliminate shooting the back of tourist’s heads. Living where I do, getting shots of bighorns is a rare occurrence for me, so I was taking advantage of the parking lot rams. But instead of just asking everyone to back up, the ranger charged the rams, yelling as he hurdled the fence, and sent them running across the highway, with no regard for their safety in doing so. It wasn’t the first time a park employee ruined a photo op on the trip. Earlier I had a park truck driver feel compelled to blow his horn just as I was shooting a ram next to the parking lot. This was very early in the morning, no one else around, and I was a safe distance from the ram. I felt he did it simply to destroy my opportunity.
    The new rules aren’t as important as how they choose to enforce them will be. Time will tell.

    • Tony Bynum says:

      Another reply:

      “Some of the things I seen rangers do and say on my last trip floored me. I watched 2 rangers chase sheep out of Logan pass for 4 hours. Yelling and chasing them, causing them to panic and charge towards people and cars at some points. Then at 5 pm one announced they were off work and they left, thus the sheep coming in and doing whatever they wanted. I know why they want them out of the parking lot, but what’s the point when you only attempt it for 4 out of 24hrs? We listened to another Ranger giving a speech about hiking safety to a group going on a nature hike with him. He told them they should only hike in the middle of the day since wildlife was less active, thus reducing chances of a bear attack or conflict, it was safer. It was 90 degrees that day, I would almost bet heat exhaustion caused more injuries for hikers and was mote of a danger than wildlife attacks. And don’t people come to see the wildlife? Why hike when everything is bedded if you come to see wildlife? And lastly, their over reaction to any bear is crazy. One black bear near our camp grazing on grass and they had roads shut down, were yelling at people driving by for daring to slow down…volunteers with radios running around playing barney fife and yelling all sorts of commands…I was 200 yards away, inside my vehicle and in a pullout and they told me I couldn’t he there as others would stop. I asked that wasn’t it a 100yard rule and i was legally parked…didn’t matter……reason when I go I get up at daylight, avoid rangers and tourist in the middle of the day, then go out again before dark…..I know some tourists are idiots, and they need rules, but across the board rules with no adjustments to the particular place is asinine.”

  8. Tony says:

    more comments from readers:

    “Some of the things I seen rangers do and say on my last trip floored me. I watched 2 rangers chase sheep out of Logan pass for 4 hours. Yelling and chasing them, causing them to panic and charge towards people and cars at some points. Then at 5 pm one announced they were off work and they left, thus the sheep coming in and doing whatever they wanted. I know why they want them out of the parking lot, but what’s the point when you only attempt it for 4 out of 24hrs? We listened to another Ranger giving a speech about hiking safety to a group going on a nature hike with him. He told them they should only hike in the middle of the day since wildlife was less active, thus reducing chances of a bear attack or conflict, it was safer. It was 90 degrees that day, I would almost bet heat exhaustion caused more injuries for hikers and was mote of a danger than wildlife attacks. And don’t people come to see the wildlife? Why hike when everything is bedded if you come to see wildlife? And lastly, their over reaction to any bear is crazy. One black bear near our camp grazing on grass and they had roads shut down, were yelling at people driving by for daring to slow down…volunteers with radios running around playing barney fife and yelling all sorts of commands…I was 200 yards away, inside my vehicle and in a pullout and they told me I couldn’t he there as others would stop. I asked that wasn’t it a 100yard rule and i was legally parked…didn’t matter……reason when I go I get up at daylight, avoid rangers and tourist in the middle of the day, then go out again before dark…..I know some tourists are idiots, and they need rules, but across the board rules with no adjustments to the particular place is asinine.”

    • Larry Stolte says:

      GLACIER NATIONAL PARK MANAGEMENT A GROWING CONCERN

      Management in Glacier has changed a great deal in the last 50 years; some good and some bad. Backcountry use and general visitation has necessitated changes. But, in the last 5 years I have observed some outlandish behavior by employees directed at visitors and even wildlife. Areas where we were able to park in the past and observe wildlife now have boulders blocking access or signs prohibiting parking (check out the Many Glacier area and the Goat Lick along US Highway 2) with very lame excuses given or none at all.

      I have seen very poor behavior by male and female rangers directed at visitors. I’m not sure whether when one has the sidearm and badge their mentality changes but we have some that do not belong in Glacier.

      Now to some examples:

      1. About 5 years ago I was at Logan Pass and observed a number of visitors at the east end of the parking lot standing behind the retaining wall along the sidewalk. They were observing and photographing a half dozen big horn rams lying in the grasses. A female ranger approached the visitors and told them to move back since they were harassing the sheep. I was floored since there wasn’t any harassment going on – just visitors doing what many come to Glacier to experience. The people moved back and low and behold the sheep got up, jumped over the retaining wall and entered the parking lot. The young ranger then removed her hat and began running at the sheep, waving her hat and yelling. THIS WAS ONE OF THE BEST EXAMPLES I HAD SEEN OF HARASSMENT. The sheep paid the ranger no mind and continued through the parking lot. This ranger did great harm to public relations and set an extremely poor example. This kind of behavior by a ranger is unacceptable and the person responsible has no place working in her capacity in Glacier.

      2. While hiking down from Dawson Pass several years ago my hiking companion and I met a Park Naturalist hiking in the opposite direction. We talked for a while and she informed us that the Two Medicine country really needed a good forest fire since it was relatively unchanged regarding fire. This blew my mind and I questioned her statement. She made it clear that fire was necessary to maintain the health of the area. Now here is a naturalist that needs to be doing something other than working in Glacier.

      3. The inside North Fork road is a problem every year. Logging Creek floods across the road and Anaconda Creek causes problems for the road also. I cannot understand why the engineers of the Dept of Interior cannot fix those problems for once and all. However, as long as the problems are not fixed on a permanent basis the road can be closed for a great deal of the summer until the high water recedes and some temporary fixes occur in the Anaconda Creek area. This year the entire road was closed until just recently. Too close the entire road is not warranted. Some of us still would like to drive from the Fish Creek Campground to the Camas Creek drainage to hike and also to the Howe Lake trail head. It would be quite easy for the Park to place an obstruction at the parking area at the Camas Drainage trailhead stating that the road was closed beyond this point. However, by having the road completely closed I suspect that it means less patrolling by Rangers – less work to do.

      4. I’m sure many have hiked the Hidden Lake Overlook Trail from Logan Pass and used the boardwalk. The boardwalk wasn’t designed at all for visitors with short legs. I’m not speaking about children in this case. One would have thought that the design engineers would have done a little better job in addressing proper heights of the steps.

      5. Now let’s take a look at fishing on the west side of the park. I’m not at all sure what the Park is protecting in the Camas Creek drainage that really needs protecting (Rogers Lake, Trout Lake, Arrow Lake, Camas Lake and Lake Evangeline). Fishing is not prohibited but any killing of fish is illegal except in Camas and Evangline where a two fish limit (cutthroat) occurs. It would be interesting to see the hard data that supports this kind of management. The Grace Lakes in the Logging Lake drainage is another example of this kind of management. How much fishing pressure do these lakes receive? I suspect that fishing pressure was much higher many years ago than it is now and these lakes provided great fishing year after year.

      6. Now to my final comments regarding Glacier National Park’s new wildlife photography and viewing policy. One should really read this latest policy and see just how utterly unrealistic it is. If it is adhered to the Hidden Lake Overlook Trail, the Highline Trail and the viewing area at Oberlin Bend should all be closed. “To protect wildlife the following activities are prohibited” 1) Willfully approaching, remaining, viewing, or engaging in any activity within 100 yards of bears, or wolves, or within 25 yards of any other wildlife including nesting birds; or within any distance that disturbs, displaces, or otherwise interferes with the free unimpeded movement of wildlife, or creates or contributes to a potentially hazardous condition or situation.” Anyone who has hiked the trails mentioned (and there are others) or enjoyed the Oberlin Bend viewing area know that they would be in violation of the new policy on a continual basis, especially as related to mountain goats.

      Please don’t get me wrong. Glacier National Park is one great treasure for us all. It is just too bad there are some bad apples working in the wrong areas. And some management decisions and lack of action should require rethinking.

      • Tony says:

        Whew! That’s a mouth full Larry! Thanks for sharing your thoughts, maybe the folks at GNP will read this thread and find some useful information from all that we have said here! Thank you again and keep up the great work! Tony Bynum

  9. Kevin Root says:

    Good article Tony. Viewing wildlife, the laws and ethics is a good topic but perhaps a challenging and controversial one as well at times. I like to photograph and view wildlife as a hobby and I also want to follow the laws. I find myself getting more and more concerned about adding more regulation that’s already seemingly stringent enough on our public lands. The intent to protect both wildlife and the folks viewing it is a good one but when laws and regulation seemingly make it near impossible to fulfill the legal requirements it becomes on the verge of absurd. Each animal does have its own space comfort zone and there is an element of danger to both human and to animals depending on the animal and the circumstances.

    Reading regulation written like in Yellowstone’s for instance, “It is illegal to willfully remain near or approach wildlife, including birds, within ANY distance that disturbs or displaces the animal.”, can border on the vague and can verge on the absurd though. It’s becoming more and more concerning and making me nervous or giving me a guilty feeling to take photos and view wildlife in our National Parks and public lands. If the animal gets “disturbed or displaces”, due to sight, sound or smell at any distance, I can be held in violation the way I read the Yellowstone regulation at least.

    Side note: That’s an awesome mountain goat and landscape picture.

    • Tony says:

      Thank you Kevin for your kind compliment regarding the goat photo! Also thank you for commenting. I actually shared the same thoughts as you shared with me in your comments, with Glacier National Park. I too feel so guilty just being in some places in Glacier National Park, that I no longer go there anymore as I know i’ll be violating the rules just by being there. And if i decided to pack some camera gear along, I’m almost always the first one to get the attention, even though I’m the one following what rules i can follow and shooting from a safe and respectable distance. You would think the first people that get yelled at would be the people who are actually being stupid and using no common sense. But hey, few people that works in any park like photographers . . . I hope you’ll find some piece in the park, I know I’m looking for it . . . Tony Bynum, Montana Photographer

  10. Pat Comer says:

    I realize we have folks in this world that are oblivious to the fact animals in parks are WILD and it’s not a petting zoo in the East but folks that spend a lifetime around animals do tend to be able to read them. I hate seeing this set of parameters being applied to all persons and situations. Blanket rules and laws tend to be . …….. I’m at a loss for a proper word !

  11. Tony says:

    The policy is a little misguided but it could be workable with a few revisions . .

  12. dan wiebe says:

    this makes me think of 2 things,
    1st this is more of a guide line not a set in stone law, if it were there would be LOTS of tickets issued in the park…

    2nd this is more of a cyoa law for the park so everyone who gets maimed or killed by an animal in the park cant sew the park. that part is sad, but with the way people are now days, smart on the parks side. so if your a jerk and a bear eats your face off you were with-in the 300 ft, not only are you dead, but you get a ticket… and the park cant be sewed for not protecting the visitors…

  13. Hi Tony, first of all great blog piece. I am a professional photographer living in Southwest Montana. I would like to share a very negative “encounter” I had with a park ranger this past week while in Glacier. From the time we arrived we were stuck in long delays for road construction, which was on both ends of Going-To-The-Sun Road, with the east side of the highway being closed from 9pm-7am. So much for any decent sunrise/sunset photography on that side of the park. So we headed to West Glacier and stayed over there for a night. Besides wanting to get a campsite in Many Glacier the next morning, I wanted to shoot sunrise at Logan Pass so we packed up very early in the morning (around 3-3:15am) and headed up to Logan Pass. I gathered my gear and set off on the trail just after 4am, while my fiance waited in the car with our two dogs.

    After shooting sunrise I headed back to our vehicle (it was around 8am by this time) only to find a ranger writing my fiance a citation for “overnight camping”. My fiance told me she tried explaining the situation to the ranger who said she “didn’t have time” to listen to her story and acted as if she was lying to her about me being out hiking. My fiance was not even sleeping when the ranger showed up, she was arranging stuff in our vehicle and feeding our dogs at the time.

    When I asked the ranger what the problem was I was ignored and when I tried explaining the situation I was rudely told to go sit in my vehicle, I refused. Naturally I got upset and demanded answers from this woman, who clearly had a chip on her shoulder. She threatened to call in additional law enforcement if I did not go sit in my vehicle. She made my fiance pay on the spot for the ticket and did not give her any other option. After she finished processing the payment she told my fiance that the only other option was to go to court and protest the ticket, which I later found out she was suppose to mention before processing the payment. We live in Silver Gate, so it’s about a 10 hour drive depending on traffic in Yellowstone to get to West Glacier, and it would end up costing us more in gas to drive up there to fight this ticket, which by the way is $125.

    This park ranger also made my fiance wait inside our vehicle for over an hour while she drove around nabbing other people she suspected of “camping”, all the while there were 6 or 7 rams in the parking lot and people chasing them all around taking pictures of them. At one point the ranger even chased the rams with her truck, and used her siren to scare them away so she could go write somebody else a ticket.

    I confronted several other park rangers throughout the day asking what hours the park was open I was told the park does not have hours, it is open all the time. Apparently this is not the case because I received this violation for being in a parking lot “to early”. I shoot a lot of night landscapes and like to get on a trail early. I do it quite often in Yellowstone and I’ve never had a problem. I also asked the rangers if it was against the law to sleep in your vehicle during the day, which I also do quite often when nothing is going on, and they said it is not. Their definition of “camping” is if they see you preparing a sleeping bag inside your vehicle “for the intent of overnight camping”. This woman showed up at 8am and assumed my fiance was “camping”. Even if she WAS napping while waiting for me to return, which she was not, that is not illegal during the day.

    The felt that the behavior of this ranger was completely unacceptable. I am going to go public with this story and get the word out about Glacier National Park, and how yuppified it is becoming. I’ve never had an experience like this in ANY national park, and being a photographer I’ve been to quite a few.

    Unfortunately this wasn’t our only bad experience in the park in the short time we were there. The night before we were told to move our vehicle from a pullout on G-T-T-S Road because we were blocking traffic, even though there was none. I told the ranger I would move as soon as I could, as traffic in the opposite lane was coming and I could not pull out safely. After he drove off I got out to look and my tires were off the highway, completely. Being near Yellowstone I am quite aware of this rule. We were also treated very poorly at the entrance stations, by park employees, and were not once offered a park map, or newspaper.

    It is not our fault they are tired of dealing with the tourists all summer long, that is their job. I have been on the phone off and on all morning trying to get a hold of the head of law enforcement at Saint Mary as well as the “acting” superintendent of the park. They apparently don’t like to answer the phone, it’s a good thing this is not an emergency.

    Apparently even photographing the park is against the law now. Unbelievable. It’s not what you CAN’T do in a national park anymore, it is what you CAN do. Hmmm, sounds like a good title for a future blog post…

  14. YOUR COMMENT REGARDING PARK EMPLOYEES INTENTIONALLY SCARING OFF ANIMALS, REMINDED ME OF THE TRIP MY WIFE AND I HAD TAKEN in 2011 AND SPENT 3-4 DAYS INSIDE ONE OF THE PARK LODGES, DUE TO HORRIBLE WEATHER CONDITIONS, ONLY TO LEAVE THE PARK EARLY MORNING TO START OUR TRIP HOME, AND ENCOUNTERED SHEEP IN A OVERLOOK AREA. WE HAD PULLED IN FOR A FINAL VIEW, AND HAPPENED ON A GROUP OF BIG HORNS, JUST A FEW YARDS FROM THE OVERLOOK. WE WERE PARKED, AND THEY JUST CAME WANDERING IN FROM THE TREES. THIS WAS REALLY A WONDERFUL ENCOUNTER, UNTIL A PARK EMPLOYEE DROVE IN, AND PROCEEDED TO HONK HIS HORN AT THE ANIMALS. THIS WAS AT SUNRISE AND NOT ANOTHER CAR OR PERSON WAS IN SIGHT. THE TRIP HAD BEEN DISAPPOINTING DUE TO BAD WEATHER, BUT THIS ACTION BY A PARK EMPLOYEE WAS UNBELIEVABLE! WE HAD DRIVEN FROM MINNESOTA AND THESE WERE THE ONLY ANIMALS THAT WE HAD SEEN ON OUR ENTIRE STAY IN THE PARK.
    IF THIS HAD BEEN ANYONE OTHER THAN A PARK EMPLOYEE, I WOULD HAVE TOLD HIM WHAT A “TWIT” HE WAS, BUT WE JUST INCLUDED IT WITH THE REST OF WHAT WAS A TERRIBLE TRIP, WITH THE EXCEPTION OF PURCHASING ONE OF YOUR BEAUTIFUL PRINTS AT YOUR GALLERY!!

Leave a Reply